Naked Shame?

The next video in the Objections series comes from Revelation 16:15. What’s it say? What’s the objection? Let’s just watch to find out!

As we see in this short video, context is key to interpreting Scripture. We quoted commentator and scholar FF Bruce (a non-naturist to my knowledge) who gave the historical framework to understand what is really happening in the text.

I wanted to go just one step deeper. Notice the context of the passage in Revelation 16. It’s the 6th of 7 bowl of wrath. Our verse is a parenthetical in between verses 14 and 16 which talk about Armageddon:

14 For they are demonic spirits, performing signs, who go abroad to the kings of the whole world, to assemble them for battle on the great day of God the Almighty. 15 (“Behold, I am coming like a thief! Blessed is the one who stays awake, keeping his garments on, that he may not go about naked and be seen exposed!”) 16 And they assembled them at the place that in Hebrew is called Armageddon. Revelation 16:14-16 ESV

Now, this is not a blog on eschatology (study of end times). It’s about Christian naturism. So we won’t delve into what Armageddon is or isn’t. I have my opinions, but that’s for another occasion, suffice to say the verse in question is about being ready for the return of our Lord. Opponents of Christian naturism ignore this context and simply pluck it out of the passage and use it for their purposes in countering what they believe to be evil. As you see here, the ESV does not even mention “shame.” Where the King James Version mentioned “shame” the English Standard Version simply says “exposed.” Just as FF Bruce stated in the video, those temple guards who fell asleep on the job and weren’t vigilant had their (expensive) clothes taken away and burned as they left in disgrace. This historical background supports the context of being ready for our spiritual battle and be spiritually awake as we wait for the Lord and Armageddon (however that plays out). It does not work to just say nudity is shameful as proponents of body shame in the church tend to do.

Proof-texting is never a good idea. We aim to give context to the passages we quote from the Bible. We want our conclusions to match up with the revelation of God’s word, not the other way around. Too many Christians start with their ideas and use Scripture (out of context) to try and support our idea. Perhaps we will be accused of doing the same to support naturism. The truth is, we came to naturism after years of holding these same convictions about Bible interpretation and being against the ideas we promote on this blog. We started asking better questions, and applying the hermeneutical principles we said we believed, which resulted in being naturists by biblical conviction. (See my friend’s awesome posts about that phrase and his conclusions here.)

We will have more videos soon and more regular blogs every week for the foreseeable future. Thanks so much for reading and sharing these posts and videos with others!

See all “Objections” series blogs and videos here.

Bathsheba Tempts David

Another common objection to Christian naturism is that seeing a nude woman will provoke lust and cause a man to sin. Case in point: Bathsheba and David. Bathsheba really gets a bad rap, but really, David is the one at fault. After all, Bathsheba was just taking a bath. She was doing what people did in those days. David had a view of people’s rooftops and he watched, and what he did was the sin. Seeing isn’t the sin. Looking with intent or desire, and coveting what is not yours (lust) is. Public bathing was a common sight, whether a rooftop or river or creek. Witnessing a person bathing can be perfectly innocent. Coveting, adultery, and murder (as in the case of David) are clear violations against God’s commandments.

As Chad Thompson wrote on page 90 of his book, That Famous Fig Leaf:

The story of David and Bathsheba is often referenced as a biblical admonition of nudity, as if Bathsheba was tempting David by bathing in the courtyard. Yet every other woman in Jerusalem did the same thing. Whether male or female, rich or poor, outdoor bathing was universal to the ancient cultures of both Egypt and Israel. The second chapter of Exodus even recounts Pharaoh’s daughter bathing in the open river while Jewish commoners walk about. Women participating in the culturally natural phenomenon of open bathing was not anything King David wasn’t used to seeing on a daily basis. What led him to rape his neighbor’s wife was not her public bath, but the evil in his own heart. Furthermore, if Bathsheba had committed any sin by exposing her body in public, it would seem odd that Nathan made her the “innocent lamb” in his story.

Watch this video to see a surprising but true example of public nudity that was church sanctioned:

For more studies on baptism practices of the early church read this short paper here.

See all “Objections” series blogs and videos here.

God Made Clothes?

I remember having the talk. No not that talk, the one about fig leaves and God making clothes for Adam and Eve. I was in kindergarten. I went to a friend’s house and we took our clothes off to play. I don’t know who suggested that activity, but it was probably me. I did suggest that we take our naked play outside. So we climbed out the window in his room and played in the grass out back behind his apartment complex. There was nothing inappropriate, other than breaking social convention, that is. It was all fun and games until his mom caught us, then it was game over!

That’s what brought on the talk. His mom told my parents what we had done, and my parents  took me home and sat me down. They told me I can’t be doing that kind of thing, and went on to lecture me about how God clothed Adam and Eve, and we need to be clothed now at all times. The inner nudist in me started to die and shame started taking its place.

It would be half a lifetime later that I would revisit what my well-intentioned parents taught me that day. I had never really pondered God’s question to Adam and Eve, “Who said you were naked?” I never thought much about clothes being an invention of humans (with some help or suggestions from a certain serpent). I was duped like all of humanity. I exchanged the truth of God for a lie. It’s time to reclaim the truth. That’s what this video is about…

See all “Objections” series blogs and videos here.

Leviticus says what???

My friend Jason (if you read the comfortablist blog, you know about Jason) has been helping me with this project since I put out the first “Objections” video. In fact, this video is a remake of the first one released. We have tweaked the content a bit and upgraded the voiceover. Instead of an artificial intelligence narration, we have hired a professional. Some generous naturist friends have contributed to help pay for these services. Jason and I do the writing and video editing pro-bono. If you would like to contribute towards our plans for at least 10 of such videos, let me know on the contact page and I will email you a way to help out. Each narration costs about $50-75, and we are finding unique voices for each video. Of course, there’s no pressure. We want to keep all our content free to view!

We are looking forward to putting out a new video as time allows, and hoping they will be shared far and wide. We especially hope that some of the videos get shared and seen outside of the naturist community to help stretch the thinking among our textile oriented friends. In case you missed the first video with a professional voiceover, you can watch “False Modesty” here.

The following objection and argument is an easy one. We will be delving into more difficult objections soon. However, that said, many opponents of Christian nudism (they may not even know the term “naturism”) will use Leviticus against us. As stated, the defense is easy, but it often doesn’t matter, if you are set in your ways. It would most likely take more than this video to convince anyone of a better way, but it’s such a common argument, that we must address it with an honest approach.

There can be achieved a chaste nakedness. Simple nudity is simply not prohibited…

Thanks for reading, watching, and sharing. Stay tuned for more exciting installments on this series of common objections to Christian naturism answered.

See all “Objections” series blogs and videos here.

False Modesty

The next installment from the “Objections” video series comes from 1 Timothy 2:9-10. This is an often quoted passage to encourage modest dress in primarily females. But is that the real message in the text? This short video explains our feelings on the matter.

Mrs. Phil and I have written previously on this blog about modesty:

Naked Modesty

Lust, Modesty, and Purity

Undressed for Worship

What passes today for modesty can easily become a false modesty or even a source of pride. Granted many of the proponents of modesty are well intentioned and their motives may be pure, but in our opinion, the general practice is not serving the purpose it claims to address. And with arbitrary standards of what is modest enough, one could go all the way and have a full covering burka, taking that logic to its natural (though unnatural) conclusion.

We have chosen to go the opposite way, because if the logic of the body as obscene is wrong, then the natural conclusion would be that body is and can be right in any state of dress and even undress. This is untenable for some because of indoctrination, tradition, and hyper-conservatism. It takes an open mind and courage to reject lies and embrace truth.

And the truth… sets one free! (John 8:32)

See all “Objections” series blogs and videos here.